Posts tagged ‘video tutorial’

Part 8 … Tracing Without Tears

Part 8 of the Tracing Without Tears series puts the point editing info from Part 7 into use to clean up a broken line trace, and to manually trace an image that can’t be autotraced. Thanks so much for your incredible support of this series!

And in case you missed Part 1 (intro), you can find it here,Part 2 (threshold) is here, Part 3 (line art) is here , Part 4 (print and cut) is here, Part 5 (filter tech) is here, Part 6 (photos) is here and Part 7 (point editing) is here.

And there’s a playlist here.

May 17, 2013 at 8:18 pm 14 comments

Part 7 … Tracing Without Tears really Point Editing

Part 7 of the Tracing Without Tears series is not really about tracing at all. It’s about point editing, or node editing, which is prerequisite information for cleaning up traced images and so much more. I needed to lay this groundwork so I could answer your questions in the next video. So thanks for bearing with me as we veer off course a bit. Perhaps you’ll find this handy for more than just tracing.

And in case you missed Part 1 (intro), you can find it here, Part 2 (threshold) is here, Part 3 (line art) is here , Part 4 (print and cut) is here, Part 5 (filter tech) is here, and Part 6 (photos) is here.

And there’s a playlist here.

April 23, 2013 at 5:58 pm 11 comments

Part 6 … Tracing Without Tears

For those of you who have been clamoring for a tutorial on tracing photos, I’m happy to announce the release of Tracing without Tears Part 6. I’ve learned so much along the way, and have become impressed at how much you really can do with just the limited capabilities in Silhouette Studio. I thought this would be the end of the series, but I’ve got a few extra tips and tricks that didn’t fit in the other videos so I guess there will be at least one more after this. Thanks again for all your kind comments and encouragement.

And in case you missed Part 1 (intro), you can find it here,Part 2 (threshold) is here, Part 3 (line art) is here , Part 4 (print and cut) is here, and Part 5 (filter tech) is here.

And there’s a playlist here.

March 29, 2013 at 1:00 pm 19 comments

Part 5 … Tracing Without Tears

Part 5 of the Tracing Without Tears series is done, and it answers all of you who’ve been wanting an explanation about the high pass, low pass and scaling controls. It’s a little technical and not that practical, but  is needed background before we move into more advanced tracing projects.

And in case you missed Part 1, you can find it here,Part 2 is here, Part 3 is here and Part 4 is here.

And there’s a playlist here.

March 15, 2013 at 8:35 pm 13 comments

Exporting vector content to SSDE with a Mac

Silhouette Studio Designer Edition is limited in terms of the vector file formats it can read, but by making use of an online converter, we can change popular formats such as EPS and PDF to SVG. We can also use this in conjunction with the Mac’s built in PDF generation to extract vector content from many online sources. Here’s a video to demonstrate the process.

Update: The Ideogram site now generates SVGs (just click the More Options button) so you do not need this technique for that site, but these steps are still applicable for other sites with vector PDF content.

Here are the written steps for starting with a vector PDF (this also works on a Windows machine as an alternate to “print to SVG”):

-Open or generate your printable *vector* content. (see list of suggested sources in this post)

We used Ideogram’s free online template maker for the video

-Enter your dimensions and click the Create button

-Press the Save button (disk icon). The PDF will save to your Downloads folder with the name “template”

-Go to the Misc2SVG file converter site.

-Click the Choose File button and select the PDF you just saved and click Open.

-Press the Senden button.

-Click the Download link.

-Control-click (or right click) the resultant SVG and select Save As or Save Page As.

-Enter a name and location for your file and click Save.

-From Silhouette Studio, open the SVG file you just saved.

-Click to select the SVG and then on the Cut Styles Pane click Cut. If no lines turn red, click the ungroup button one or more times and try again.

-Click the Scale button and enter 80% in the custom window. Click Apply. This will return templates from Ideogram to their exact size for cutting.

Here are the written steps for vector content that can be printed, such as from Wordle.net:

-Create your Wordle and press the Print button at the bottom of the page.

-Click the PDF button, it will pull down and then you can click Save as PDF.

-Name the file, give it a location and click the Save button.

-Go to the Misc2SVG file converter site.

-Click the Choose File button and select the PDF you just saved and click Open.

-Press the Senden button.

-Click the Download link.

-Command-click (or rightclick) the resultant SVG and select Save Page As.

-Enter a name and location for your file and click Save.

-From Silhouette Studio, open the SVG file you just saved .

-Select the SVG and on the Cut Styles Pane click Cut Edge. If no lines turn red, click the ungroup button one or more times and try again.

-Remove the background and make other edits as desired. Additional ungrouping may be necessary before you can do this.

In the video, we also drag the Wordle PDF to the mat to use for extracting colors. Select all the letters you want a certain color, then click the eye dropper and the color sample. Repeat for each color.

March 10, 2013 at 3:49 pm 4 comments

Part 4 … Tracing Without Tears

Today I’m posting Part 4 of the Tracing Without Tears series, which focuses on tracing for print and cut. I go through a half dozen representative examples including a cut file that has already been traced, a decoupage sheet, and several styles of clip art. I also unearth the mystery of the trace and detach button and show one use for the low pass filter. Thanks again for your enthusiastic response to this video series. Keep leaving your comments and keep spreading the word while I keep the videos coming!

And in case you missed Part 1, you can find it here ,Part 2 is here and Part 3 is here.

And there’s a playlist here.

March 2, 2013 at 10:28 am 21 comments

Part 3 … Tracing Without Tears

Part 3 of Tracing Without Tears is ready. This edition covers how to trace line art, and how to work with the trace results to get the kind of cuts you want using Silhouette Studio. This includes separating a trace to cut the pieces from different colors of paper or vinyl and some tips on tracing templates.

And in case you missed Part 1, you can find it here or for Part 2, click here.

February 19, 2013 at 10:08 pm 34 comments

Exporting custom templates to SSDE (Win only)

While working on my tracing series, I was reminded just how hard it is to autotrace templates. Wouldn’t it be nice to not have to trace them? I thought, and then it hit me. I went back to a 3 year old post here and found my answer. Here’s a video that shows the process for Windows (Mac solution and alternate Windows process here).

Update: The Ideogram site now generates SVGs (just click the More Options button) so you do not need this technique for that site, but these steps are still applicable for other sites with vector PDF content.

and here are the written steps:

-Install PDF creator (free) if you have not already. Download link here Be sure to decline any optional toolbars, etc.

-Open or generate your printable *vector* content. (see list of suggested sources in this post)

We used Ideogram’s free online template maker for the video

-Press the print button or select print from the file menu

-Choose PDF Creator from the dropdown list of printers and click Print. (don’t worry, it isn’t really going to print)

-Name the file in the top box and click the Save button at the bottom right.

-Choose a location for your for file, choose SVG from the pull down list of file types at the bottom of the window, and click Save.

-Open a new document in SSDE and choose File>Merge, set files of type to SVG or All files then navigate to the SVG file you just saved and click OK.

-If nothing is visible on the mat, click control-A to select all and look for a bounding box. Set the line color to black.

-Select all and set line width to zero (any line widths greater than zero in an SVG will double cut)

-On the Cut Styles Pane click Cut Edge. If no lines turn red, click the ungroup button one or more times and try again.

-In order to dash or separate score lines, ungroup the file and change the lines styles as desired.

This process maintains the proper size for ideogram’s templates (in PC Creator, your default ppi under Options>SVG should be set to 72) but it’s a good idea to verify size for anything that needs to be exact before you cut.
Tip:If the file is too big, try a reduction of 80% as this is another common standard.

February 14, 2013 at 3:39 pm 12 comments

Part 2 … Tracing Without Tears

The response to my first video has been overwhelming! I so appreciate your kind comments and welcome all my new YouTube subscribers! It seems I struck a nerve for those of you whose learning style challenges you to understand what is behind the steps you are taking. I hope this series will continue to bring you “Aha moments” on the way to full mastery of Silhouette Studio. Part 2 of Tracing Without Tears, which I am releasing today, covers how the threshold setting works, what its limitations are, and how to use it to trace several representative logos which serve as our examples.

And in case you missed Part 1, you can find it here.

February 4, 2013 at 7:04 pm 22 comments

Print and cut with CCR tutorial video

Cricut Craft Room finally fixed the bug that spit out the mat on some machines after each cut! To celebrate I’ve put together a few quick digis and a video to show how to cut them, or your own images or sentiments, with Cricut Craft Room. This demonstrates the hinge method, which also works in the same way with the Gypsy and Cricut Design Studio, as well as many other software packages on many other cutters.

Download the PDF here (goes with the Accent shape in Cricut Craft Room Basics cut at 2 inches) Be sure to print at 100%.

July 13, 2012 at 5:06 pm 18 comments

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