Posts tagged ‘Mac’

Adding thumbnails to your .studio files on a Mac

One of the shortcomings of the .studio file format is that there is no file preview. For Mac users, there is a relatively quick solution, although not an automatic one. I have a video to show you the process.

And for those of you who prefer written steps:

-open your .studio file
-hold down shift + command + control + 4 (this is kinda like twister so feel free to use both hands)
-let go once you see the “crosshairs” cursor
-drag from one corner to the other to select a roughly square section of your file that includes its contents or a representative sample
-go to the folder where your file is located and click to select the file
-press command +i to open the Get Info window
-press the tab key or click on the icon at the upper left of the window. It will highlight in blue.
-press command-v to paste your screen capture as the new icon
-close the Get Info window

Your new icons will show in all views in the Finder, and via Quick Look (press spacebar in Open dialog or in Finder).

iconcover

Screen Shot 2013-10-01 at 5.11.17 PM

QuickLook

There are two caveats. First is that is that the “Date Modified” for the file will change to reflect the date you changed the icon… just something to be aware of if you later search for a file by Last Modified date instead of by Date Created. Secondly, you will lose your custom icon when you open and resave the file. This is some sort of Mac glitch I haven’t found a workaround for. If you know how to prevent either one please let me know.

And no, there is not a way to create a custom icon for a file in Windows. What you can do in Windows is create the screen capture with the Snipping Tool (Win Vista and later), give it the same name as your file and place it in the same folder as your file so the preview image is then paired with the studio file when browsing.

October 8, 2013 at 3:00 pm 21 comments

Accessing OpenType options with software you already have on your Mac

OpenType fonts are amazing, but you can’t get to all the awesomeness without Adobe Illustrator or InDesign, right? Wrong! Where there’s a will, there’s a way to get your hands on a bunch of OpenType features and every single glyph using just the software that comes with your Mac. I show you how in this video. (Tim Cook you can thank me later.)

Here are the written steps for accessing OpenType features via TextEdit:

  1. Open TextEdit (v1.6 or 1.7 are known to work) If TextEdit is not already in your Dock, type TextEdit in Spotlight search or find it in your Applications folder or LaunchPad.
  2. Type your word or phrase and highlight it.
  3. Select Format>Font>Show Fonts or ⌘-T to open the OSX Font Panel
  4. Select a font from the scrolling list and adjust the size for ease of viewing.
  5. Click on the gear icon at the lower left of the Fonts Window and select Typography to open the Typography window.
  6. Click the triangles to expand or condense the list of Typography features, which will vary depending on the font selected.
  7. With all or some of the text selected, begin toggling features in the Typography window while watching changes to the text. This is a trial and error process to find alternatives accessible from the Typography window.
    Tip: Try the process above with any program that has the OSX Font Panel.

When you are finished formatting your word or phrase, it can be exported via one of two ways:

  • screen capture (low resolution) : shift-⌘-4 to save a .png version to your desktop for import into another application; or shift-control-⌘-4 to save to the clipboard for pasting into another application

or

  • export as PDF (fully scaleable) : File>Export as PDF then type in name, choose location and click Save to create a vector PDF.

This PDF can be converted to SVG with the webapp Misc2SVG using the following steps:

  1. Go to http://www.network-science.de/tools/misc2svg/
  2. Click the Choose File button and navigate to the PDF you just exported and click Open.
  3. Click “senden.”
  4. Click Download.
  5. Safari: right click (or control-click) image in browser window and Save Page As, name file, select location, leave format as “Page Source” and Click Save.
    Firefox: right click (or control-click) image in browser window and Save Page As, name file, select location, leave format as “Web Page, SVG Only” and Click Save.
    Chrome: right click (or control-click) image in browser window and Save As, name file, select location, and click Save.
    This SVG is suitable for Inkscape, diecutting software, etc.

Here are the written steps for viewing and exporting vectors for all the OpenType glyphs via Font Book:

  1. Open Font Book. If it is not already in your Dock, type “Font Book” in Spotlight search or find it in your Applications folder or LaunchPad.
  2. Click on the font name to select the font you want to work with.
  3. Choose Preview>Repertoire for a preview of all the glyphs in the font.
  4. File>Print, choose Repertoire from the Report Type drop down menu. (Click the Show Details button and/or select Font Book from the pull down menu if you do not see this option.)
  5. Adjust the Glyph Size slider as desired and use the preview window to identify the page range you want to export.
  6. Enter the page range in the appropriate boxes.
  7. Press PDF>Save as PDF, then enter name and location and click Save.
  8. This vector PDF can be converted to SVG with the webapp Misc2SVG using the following steps:
  9. This vector PDF can be converted to SVG with the webapp Misc2SVG using the following steps: Go to http://www.network-science.de/tools/misc2svg/
  10. Click the Choose File button and navigate to the PDF you just exported and click Open.
  11. Enter the page number of the page you would like to convert into the box above the senden button. Only one page can be converted at a time.
  12. Click “senden.”
  13. Click Download.
  14. Safari: right click (or control-click) image in browser window and Save Page As, name file, select location, leave format as “Page Source” and Click Save.
    Firefox: right click (or control-click) image in browser window and Save Page As, name file, select location, leave format as “Web Page, SVG Only” and Click Save.
    Chrome: right click (or control-click) image in browser window and Save As, name file, select location, and click Save.
    This SVG is suitable for Inkscape, diecutting software, etc.

Pin-friendly title page for my video made using only TextEdit and the font Lavanderia:

accessotf

The other font shown in the video is Florence.

June 6, 2013 at 10:59 pm 26 comments

Easily find all the digital paper on your Mac

I’m not a digiscrapper, but I do collect digital paper. I like to use it with my Cricut and computer crafting projects. This week I stumbled on a way to see it all easily. If you have a Mac with OS 10.4 or later then you have what is called Smart Folders. Smart Folders are virtual (not really a folder with files but a saved search with results), and are constantly updated, so they are especially wonderful for people who want to be organized without actually moving anything. Here’s how to set up a Smart Folder for your digital paper.

1) From the Finder (desktop), choose File>New Smart Folder.

2) Click the circle with the plus sign on the right hand side of the window near the top.

(more…)

October 30, 2010 at 1:53 pm 12 comments

Make-the-Cut makes unexpected debut

I was going to be excited to report that SCAL2 for Mac was out in a form I would now call stable. I’ve been cutting with it for a week or so with no issues and looking forward to doing a full review once the Christmas rush was over… and then, without even a whispered rumor in advance, a SCAL competitor emerges.

The first version of Make-the-Cut software (for Windows only) has been released by an independent developer. First reactions are positive, at least at the introductory price of $78. Andy has taken pains to address the most painful aspects of SCAL and it is obvious from just a couple of screen shots that the interface is more polished than its predecessors. Will be interesting to see where things head with this in the coming weeks as lots of people find Black Friday Cricuts under their trees.

December 20, 2009 at 4:48 pm 39 comments

Way Cool Tool for your Mac


2013Update: Skitch has been bought by Evernote and absolutely destroyed. I no longer recommend it.

I can not remember when I have been more excited about a new piece of software than I am about Skitch. Skitch is a free screen shot/image sharing and annotating tool that is just so well designed you will have to see it to believe it. When you do you will find yourself asking yourself, “Why isn’t all software like this?” It seems like plasq has not only created a whole new kind of application we didn’t know we needed, but thought of everything as they built it and created an interface sure to be envied (and hopefully emulated) across all computerdom. I’m (obviously) not ashamed to gush over this combination application/web service which might just be the exception to that “if it seems too good to be true” rule.

Sample uses for the crafter/blogger might include
-taking, annotating, sizing and organizing screen shots for use in blog or print/pdf tutorials
-ditto for webcam shots
-cropping, resizing and annotating digital camera photos or scans for posting on blogs or message boards
-facilitating multiple images in a single post on Cricut message board
-creation of dummy thumbnails for scut or svg files

April 10, 2009 at 6:16 am 1 comment

Instant font slideshow in Mac OSX (Leopard & later)

Compared to the PC side, there is a dearth of font viewing software for Macs. In particular, none of the freebies and few of the for-pay font utilities I have found allow you to view uninstalled fonts. However, you can view the character sets for your fonts, whether installed or uninstalled with this Mac OSX Leopard  (and beyond) trick.

Open a finder window and select the fonts you want to view. Here I have filtered my downloaded fonts folder by searching for “ttf” to eliminate most of the folders and read me files. It doesn’t matter what view you are in. I am showing this in the cover flow view, because some of you may not know you can use it for fonts.

picture-15

Next just tap the space bar (or the QuickView icon which looks like an eye) and your font slide show window will appear. Use the arrow keys to navigate or click on the triangle on the screen to play the slideshow automatically. In Lion it  looks like you have to press the full screen button before you get the slide show option.

picture-17

The contact sheet button works, too, though it acted a little quirky for me .

picture-191

This is really a lot of fun to play with. Hope you enjoy it as much as I do.

February 8, 2009 at 6:25 am 6 comments


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