Posts tagged ‘fonts’

Making the most of Dafont.com

Making the most of Dafont.com video and written tutorial. Tips and tricks for using everyone's favorite font download site.

Most everyone knows you can download awesome free fonts at Dafont.com, but it’s got some other features you may be missing out on. Here’s a list of some cool things you can do at Dafont besides downloading:

1. Preview fonts with your own text

2. Customize the size of the text and number of fonts per page

3. View different cases of your preview text

4. View/download a character key

5. View all the variants of a font

6. Filter for commercial use OK fonts

7. Find fonts by the same designer

8. Find fonts in the same category

9. Browse fonts by category

10. Browse fonts by designer

11. Filter for foreign features

12. Create your own categories

13. Learn how to install fonts

14. Get help identifying a font

15. See the newest uploads

16. Sort by popularity, name or date

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Take a look at my Robots category for an example.

July 23, 2014 at 4:30 pm 11 comments

Using Laura Worthington fonts with Silhouette Studio

Samantha by Laura Worthington on sale right now at Mighty Deals!

There’s an exciting development in the type design world and that is that a few designers are starting to fully map their OTF fonts to Unicode so that they are more accessible to those without Adobe Illustrator, Corel Draw, and expensive design software that has been required in the past.

Laura Worthington is not only one of our favorite type designers as diecutters, but she has taken the lead on this. Her information on accessing all the special characters in her fonts with Windows is here. I took this a step further with a video on how to use her fonts in Silhouette Studio for Windows.

Update: I already made this video twice, but I keep finding mistakes and things I should have added as I explore this topic more and answer your questions. Please note the following

The prerequisites (shown and discussed at the beginning and end of the video) should be:

-Any Windows version of Silhouette Studio (even V2 standard, contrary to what I say in the video)

-Fonts coded for Character Map (or fully mapped to Unicode)

-Desktop font purchased, OTF version installed

Update: For those of you having trouble seeing the characters in Windows Character Map, the free utility Nexus Font also has a Character Map that makes viewing easier. Written tutorial from Paper Moon Snippets here.

On the Mac side, some of my earlier techniques are no longer working because the necessary web app has been discontinued. The method Laura recommends does work with Silhouette Studio but, like mine referenced above, is also quite contorted. My research has led me to believe that the best solution for MacOS 10.8 (or 10.9 with Silh Studio basic) is a $9.95 app called Ultra Character Map, but since it only runs on Mac OS 10.8 or better, I haven’t been able to test it myself yet.
If you run MacOS 10.9, I’ve just discovered a new free solution.

Another Mac option is Inkscape. In Inkscape you can enter Unicode values into a text cox directly by typing Cntr-U first then the code. So  you would use Font Book Repertoire view and hover over the character you want to determine the Unicode value, then type it into Inkscape. When you are done, convert text to path (Path>Object to Path) and then save as SVG for import into SSDE or as DXF for import into SS basic edition.

UPDATE: Gioviale by Laura Worthington is on sale right now at Mighty Deals.
Funkydori by Laura Worthington is also on sale right now at Mighty Deals.

So far the only other fonts I have found that are fully mapped are from Yellow Design Studio. You may know them from the beautiful Melany Lane font. (They also designed Thirsty Script but as far as I know it is not fully mapped). Here’s a freebie of theirs you can try out: Gist Upright
Update: Fonts by Debi Sementelli are also fully mapped. Debi is the designer of the fabulous Cantoni font!

Be sure to thank these designers for mapping their fonts and tell them that CleverSomeday sent you.

June 13, 2014 at 2:51 pm 43 comments

Character map template for Silhouette Studio

A while back, I posted Character Map templates for Inkscape and Adobe Illustrator. The purpose of these is to make it quick and easy to make a one page reference map of the main glyphs in a given font, especially dingbat fonts. Today I’m adding a Silhouette version to the lineup.

You can download the .studio template here, download the .studio3 template here  and instructions are in the margin of the file, but here’s a quick rundown. As with all my templates, I recommend you store them on your hard drive instead of your library and that you always work from a duplicate. An easy way to do this is to Save as and rename the file as soon as you open it.

Once you’ve opened a duplicate template, click anywhere in the middle of the page. You’ll see a bounding box to indicate that the grid is selected. Click the A button at the top of the screen (not the A button on the side of the screen).

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Select the font you want to map from the scrolling list on the right. You should see the characters change to the new font’s. Label the page by typing in the name of the font into the text box provided at the top of the page. This is optional, but will help you remember which font you are looking at.

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Here’s what a completed page looks like for my 09kutups font.

You can print the page, print it to PDF or just glance at it temporarily for reference. If you want to be able to use the characters after you uninstall the font, click the center of the page again to select the characters, choose Object>Convert to Path, then save the file.

And if you want some suggestions for great dingbats for cutting, here’s a great place to start. Ten Great Dingbats for Diecutting

April 16, 2014 at 4:23 pm 23 comments

Distressed HTV Technique

Get a distressed look with heat transfer vinyl without tedious weeding.
I’ve been experimenting with a new technique for getting a distressed look with heat transfer vinyl and while it may not be ready for widespread adoption, I wanted to go ahead and share it with you.

What you need:
heat transfer vinyl with mylar backing (I’m using Siser Easy Weed)
a cutting board or other hard surface you don’t mind damaging
a new or clean Ped-Egg
optionally, a new cheese grater like the one pictured from Dollar Tree

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Cut and weed your HTV as usual. It’s a good idea to practice with scraps so grab some of that HTV you forgot to mirror!

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Place it on your surface sticky side up and begin to scrape across it with the Ped-Egg. The goal is to cut through the vinyl layer without lifting it, and to do minimum damage to the mylar. Start slowly and lightly and increase your pressure until you get it right.

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It helps to extend it over the edge of your cutting surface for better contact with the cutting teeth.

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After a bit, brush the excess away from your design onto the surrounding sticky area and see what your design looks like from the mylar side. Continue with several more cycles until you reach the desired level of distress.

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Inspect the vinyl surface and remove or tamp down any larger flaps or tears that would hinder the vinyl from laying flat.
Press as usual or a little shorter on time, then remove the backing and repress with just the teflon sheet for a few seconds to be sure all the vinyl is secure.

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Because the teeth on the Ped-Egg are small, it produces small scale distress (the letters above are 1 inch tall). For larger scale images, try the large round holes on the Dollar Tree cheese grater. This will result in more flaps and damage to the vinyl and backing, but you can use the Ped-Egg in a subsequent pass to help clean it up.

IMPORTANT: Let me emphasize that this is experimental. This technique obviously does not allow for optimal adhesion of the vinyl across 100% of its surface and especially along the distressed edges. Some of the tiny pieces will not adhere at all because they will be upside down. I do not have long term wear or laundering experience with this. Use this technique at your own risk. And of course, use appropriate caution when handling sharp objects.

January 29, 2014 at 1:02 pm 8 comments

Power tips for text to path in Silhouette Studio

Screen Shot 2013-09-06 at 12.36.15 PM

If you’ve only been using “text to path” in Silhouette Studio to curve words into a circle, then you have barely scratched the surface of what this fun feature can do. Here’s a video that will start with the basics and move on to the techniques that will make you a power user.

And be sure to grab Border Bits, the font I demo in the video, here.

December 11, 2013 at 11:27 am 42 comments

10 more great welding cursive fonts for diecutters

Here’s a list of 10 more cursive fonts that cut and weld wonderfully, and, as you can see, they look great as well. Download at the links below the graphic.

Great free welding cursive fonts for diecutters

1)Alex Brush 2)Arsenale White 3)Bira 4)Dancing Script 5)Grand Hotel 6)KG Always a Good Time 7)Monoment 8)Sacramento 9)Sofia 10)Xiomara

The first set of great fonts for welding is here.

June 14, 2013 at 7:54 pm 31 comments

10 great free dingbat fonts for diecutters

Free dingbat fonts are a great source of images to use with your diecutter, but how do you know which ones cut nicely? I’ve done the trial and error for you on these ten fonts that are perfect for diecutting. Links are listed below the graphic.

10 great dingbats for diecutters

1)09kutups 2)Efon 3)Board Dudes 4)Damask Dings 5)Hibiscus 6)Kalocsai Flowers 7)Peoni Patterns 8)ND Urban 9)Sepeda 10)Sewing Patterns

10 great Doodlebats for diecutters

10 more great Doodlebats for diecutters

May 1, 2013 at 6:36 pm 27 comments

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