Archive for April, 2010

Pre-filled fonts for gel pens

I had a prior post where I gave a rather contorted procedure for filling in the fonts that you draw with Cricut markers, gel pens, etc. Today I had a better idea. Find fonts that already have a “fill” that works with the Cricut. So I tested a bunch of fonts with my gel pens and when one seemed promising, I reduced the size until the fill looked solid. Some look really nice with the crosshatch showing, as well. All of these are freebies from either fonts101.com or dafont.com.

Keep in mind that these take a long time to draw, so plan ahead. If you want to use markers instead of gel pens, there are many more options, or you can use the fonts above at even at larger sizes. Also see this previous post about single line fonts.

April 30, 2010 at 10:58 pm 2 comments

More gel pen jiggle testing

I have tried some more tests and find that I get less jiggle with the pastel and neon pens. My results are shown below. Notice that the Staples pastels show up better, but have a skipping problem. To print brighter with the Cri-Kit pens or cover over skipping with the Staples pens use multicut to draw over the lines a second time. (For reference, the top upper case ABC is 1/4 inch tall)

April 22, 2010 at 7:26 pm 2 comments

Gel pen jiggle testing

Looks like between Chomas Creations (Custom Crops and/or Staples pens) and Cri-Kits we have the gel pen holder conquered. Both holders and the pens that accompany them will do a fine job on small images cut directly from a cartridge as shown in the image below, drawn at 3/4 inches high.

There remains a significant problem when cutting from a computer however. I compared a Provocraft cartridge image with a similar, node optimized, SVG in SCAL and MTC. As you can see, all of the computer-driven versions have significant “jiggle” compared to the direct cartridge image. (Click on the picture to see the enlarged image, also drawn at 3/4 inches high.)

The Chomas holder with Staples pens seems to do a slightly better job with the computer-driven drawing than the Cri-Kits pen/holder (at least with the dark blue pens I tested) but the results at small sizes are still not very impressive with either. (For reference, the top upper case ABC is 1/4 inch tall)

It helps some to increase the size of your images. Here is the same node-optimized letter at about 1-1/2 inches high using 3 different pens. As you can see, the ballpoint Silhouette Sketch pens do not show the jiggling quite as much. It makes sense that the more free-flowing the ink, the more pronounced the jiggle is.

I also tested various speeds and pressures but could not see any improvement. I also tried optimized images (minimum nodes/control points) and polyline images (many nodes/control points) and the results were still unimpressive. My guess is that the disparity has to do with the coordinate systems for cartridge cutting (perfectly matched) versus computer-driven cutting (imperfect conversion). I am further convinced that this is a machine limitation because I’m told that the same files draw smoothly with a Silhouette cutter, and because no one else has been able to show me an SVG that cuts as smooth on a Cricut as a cartridge.

I also tested the Staples ink tube/tip in the Cri-Kits pen shell and vice-versa. You can enjoy using the inexpensive Staples pen innards as refills in your Cri-Kit holder, just turn up the pressure until you have contact with the paper. Unfortunately, the Cri-Kits ink tubes do not work in the Staples pen barrel, because the exposed tip is too long, even at minimum pressure.

BTW, there are lots of great gel pen ideas hitting the blogs right now like this post from my good friend PapaSue , this one from Denise at PaperPastime, this one from Shelly at Paper Flowers and this one from Samantha the Scrapmaster.

April 19, 2010 at 5:11 pm 9 comments

Inkscape paint bucket basics video

Here’s the video I should have done first, showing how to tame the Inkscape paint bucket tool. Also included in this video is an example of how to use this technique to convert graphics from Lettering Delights.

April 9, 2010 at 9:10 pm 9 comments

Print on chipboard in your CD tray

I found a way to print on chipboard with the help of my Cricut. I cut the tag shapes I wanted surrounded by a CD shape. Then I take them off the mat, load them into the CD tray of my inkjet printer and print.

CD printing is highly precise so this also works for printing precisely onto small paper shapes.

Download the chipboard printing templates and instructions here.

Update: SVG version of CD tray insert has been added.

April 5, 2010 at 7:30 pm 16 comments


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